Robert Potter

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Robert Potter
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Born (1985-03-11) March 11, 1985 (age 37)
NationalityAustralian
CitizenshipAustralia
OccupationCyber-security expert

Robert Aaron Potter (born in 1985) is an Australian cyber-security expert.

Potter co-foundered the cyber-security company Internet 2.0, that specialises in cybersecurity technology, digital forensics and intelligence analysis across Latin America, the Middle East and the Asia-Pacific on behalf of the US State Department.[1][2] His cyber-security work with Internet 2.0 came to public attention when he exposed open World Health Organization cyber defences, verifying an online dump of 25,000 email addresses and passwords allegedly from National Institutes of Health, WHO, and the Gates Foundation.[3][4]

Following that, Internet 2.0's role in analysing and assessing the "Shanghai Files" as well as Chinese PCR purchases in the months leading up to the first known COVID-19 cases attracted significant interest.[5][6] (The Shanghai Files refer to a leaked Shanghai Public Security Bureau database containing PSB watchlists of tens of thousands of persons of interest, reports from informants, facial and vehicle recognition photographs, and immigration data.)

Potter has also analysed data on behalf of the the Australian government in relation to Chinese PCR purchases in the months leading up to the first known COVID-19 cases.[5][7][8] Potter and Internet 2.0 have also been instrumental in helping decipher mass Chinese government surveillance database leaks.[2] The company has also tracked Chinese cyber-attacks against Uyghurs and Australian human rights activists including Drew Pavlou and Vicky Xu.[9][10]

References

  1. Mizen, Ronald (14 April 2021). "Aussie cyber experts fight back against North Korea". The Australian Financial Review. Retrieved 11 April 2022.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Hurst, Daniel (15 September 2020). "How an Australian cybersecurity firm helped decipher Zhenhua Data leak". The Guardian (Australian edition). Retrieved 11 April 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  3. Mekhennet and Timberg, Souad and Craig (22 April 2020). "Nearly 25,000 email addresses and passwords allegedly from NIH, WHO, Gates Foundation and others are dumped online". The Washington Post. Retrieved 11 April 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  4. Burton, Tom (23 April 2020). "How a Canberra researcher cracked the WHO in hours". The Australian Financial Review2. Retrieved 11 April 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  5. 5.0 5.1 Rubinsztein-Dunlop and Hui, Sean and Echo (1 April 2021). "Australians flagged in Shanghai security files which shed light on China's surveillance state and monitoring of Uyghurs". ABC News. Retrieved 11 April 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  6. "What do the PM, a billionaire and a pop star have in common? China's interested in all three". ABC News. 2020-09-14. Retrieved 2022-04-11.
  7. Tarabay, Jamie (4 October 2021). "China PCR Purchases Spiked in Months Before First Known Covid Cases, Firm Says". Bloomberg. Retrieved 11 April 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  8. Zappone, Chris (5 October 2021). "Spending on PCR tests in China soared months before first COVID-19 cases revealed: report". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 11 April 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  9. Mendes, Liam (4 October 2021). "Activist Drew Pavlou's hacked emails putting Uighurs at risk". The Australian. Retrieved 11 April 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  10. "China's grubby cyber hit on Aussie researcher". The Daily Telegraph. 16 January 2021. Retrieved 11 April 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)

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