Song Senghorn

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Song Senghorn
សុង សេងហ៊ន
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Born
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
CitizenshipAmerican
Education
  • Pao Oum Primary School
  • Preah Sisowath High School
OccupationSinger-composers
Years active1982-present
Known forKnown as the Queen of ramkbach

Song Senghorn was one of the most popular singer-composers throughout Cambodia in the 1990s[1].

Biography

Song Songhorn was born in Phnom Penh. She is the second of four siblings (two girls, two boys). She studied at Pao Oum Primary School (now Tuol Kork Primary School) and she continued at Preah Sisowath High School. During the Khmer Rouge regime, she was evacuated to Phnom Srok district, in the province of Battambang (now Banteay Meanchey province). In 1979, after the fall of the Khmer Rouge, Song Seng Horn fled to the United States and set up a library called Saran Nara to run a newspaper and a music business. Today, Seng is living in Pennsylvania, in the northeastern United States, with her family.

Musical career

The talent of Song Songhorn was discovered when she was just a child refugee in the refugee camps of Khao-I-Dang. After she obtained asylum in the United States, began her career as a singer in 1982. During the twentieth century, Song Seng Horn's songs were popular among Cambodian audiences throughout the country and in the Khmer diaspora.

On top of many personal compositions, she covered various songs of pre-Khmer Rouge artists, including Violon Sneha of Sinn Sisamouth.

Though she is now lesser known from younger generations, her music made a certain come-back avec Cambodian popstar Aok Sokunkanha and judge on the Cambodian reality singing competition program Cambodian Idol made a cover of her famous song Sreas Choy reaching 4.4 millions views on Youtube[2].​

Musical style

Song Senghorn tackled many different styles including folk, ramvong, ramkbach and Western covers sang in Khmer language. She was known as the "Queen of ramkbach"[3].

In the media

     

External links

References

  1. Broughton, Simon (1999). World Music: Latin and North America, Caribbean, India, Asia and Pacific. Rough Guides. ISBN 978-1-85828-636-5.
  2. Ouk Sokun, Kanha (May 18, 2016). "ស្រះអួយ". YouTube. Retrieved March 24, 2020.
  3. Broughton, Simon (1999). World Music: Latin and North America, Caribbean, India, Asia and Pacific. Rough Guides. ISBN 978-1-85828-636-5.

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