Fred Leighton

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Fred Leighton
Private
IndustryAntique jewelry
FounderMurray Mondschein
Headquarters
New York City
Website[[[:Template:Wdib]] ] 

Fred Leighton, a seller of antique jewelry in New York City, was founded by Murray Mondschein[1] when he bought a Mexican arts and crafts store in Greenwich Village in 1959 called Fred Leighton.[2] Mondschein added wedding dresses and Georgian, Victorian, and Art Deco jewelry to the inventory. In the 1970s, he moved his store to the Upper East Side, and in 1986 legally changed his name to Fred Leighton.[3] In 2005, Leighton sold the company to Ralph Esmerian. Under his ownership, the company filed bankruptcy in 2008, and in 2010, Esmerian was charged with bankruptcy fraud, wire fraud, and concealing assets. He was sentenced to six years in federal prison and fined $20 million.[4][5]

In 2009, Kwiat Enterprises, LLC together with Sculptor Capital Management|Och-Ziff Capital Management Group and FOF Inventory Holding, purchased Fred Leighton’s assets, including its inventory and retail stores in New York and Las Vegas, in a $25.8 million bankruptcy court deal.[6] Kwiat is an American jeweler based in New York City. The company was founded by Sam Kwiat in 1907 and remains privately held by the Kwiat family.[7]

Fred Leighton began lending jewelry to celebrities in 1996 when client Miuccia Prada[8] borrowed a necklace for Nicole Kidman to wear to the Oscars. Since then, celebrities have continued to wear Fred Leighton for awards ceremonies like the Golden Globe Awards|Golden Globes and the Academy Awards and cultural events like the Met Gala.

The company's jewels can also be seen in films including Marie Antoinette;[9] The Devil Wears Prada (film)|The Devil Wears Prada,[10] and the Sex and the City film[11].

References

  1. Sandomir, Richard (2017-08-04). "Fred Leighton, a Jeweler Who Made Stars Glitter, Dies at 85 (Published 2017)". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2020-10-28.
  2. Sandomir, Richard (2017-08-04). "Fred Leighton, a Jeweler Who Made Stars Glitter, Dies at 85 (Published 2017)". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2020-10-28.
  3. Sandomir, Richard (2017-08-04). "Fred Leighton, a Jeweler Who Made Stars Glitter, Dies at 85 (Published 2017)". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2020-10-28.
  4. "Folk Art Collector Ralph Esmerian Gets Six Years in Federal Prison". Observer. 2011-07-27. Retrieved 2020-10-28.
  5. DeMarco, Anthony. "Former Fred Leighton Owner 'Lived a Life of Fraud and Deceit on a Massive Scale'". Forbes. Retrieved 2020-10-28.
  6. News, A. B. C. "Jeweler To The Stars Arrested in Alleged $217 Million Fraud". ABC News. Retrieved 2020-10-28.
  7. "The Kwiat Family". Art & Living. Retrieved 2020-10-28.
  8. "Red carpet jewelry: the secret to Fred Leighton's enduring success at the Oscars". www.thejewelleryeditor.com. 2015-02-20. Retrieved 2020-10-28.
  9. Bernstein, Beth. "While At Home, Binge On Jewelry-In Films". Forbes. Retrieved 2020-10-28.
  10. "Features: Even the devil can't upstage a fabulous wardrobe". Daily News. 2006-07-11. Retrieved 2020-10-28.
  11. "The business behind 'Sex and the City'". NBC News. Retrieved 2020-10-28.

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