Dhuwarrwarr Marika

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Dhuwarrwarr Marika
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Born1946
Yirrkala, Bremer Island
NationalityAustralian
Other namesBanuminy
CitizenshipAustralia
Known forContemporary Indigenous Aboriginal Art
Parent(s)
  • Mawalan Marika (father)
Relatives
  • Wandjuk Marika
  • Banduk Marika (sister)
  • Bayngul Marika (sister)
  • Mathaman Marika (uncle)
  • Milirrpum Marika (uncle)
  • Roy Dadayhga Marika (uncle)
  • Wanyubi Marika (brother)
FamilyMarika Family

Dhuwarrwarr Marika, also known as Banuminy, is a renown, female Australian[1] Contemporary Indigenous Artist. [2] She was born in 1946 in her homeland of Yirrkala, Bremer Island. She is a member of the Rirratjingu, Miliwurrwurr group and their language is Dhangu. She is part of the Dhuwa moiety.[3] Her family, the Marika family,[4] is well-known in the world of Aboriginal art; her father Mawalan Marika (1908-1967) and his brothers were talented artists who also passionately advocated for Indigenous rights.[5] Mawalan Marika was a celebrated leader of the Rirratjingu people and he was one of the signatories of the 1963 Bark Petitions to The Australian Government. [6] Before she started her art career, Dhuwarrwarr worked as a nurse in Yirrkala, Sydney, and Darwin.[4] She is a dedicated mother, grandmother, and active community member.[4] She has shown her dedication to her community by her presence on numerous local and national committees. She was a women’s council representative and executive member for the Northern land Council. [4]

Career

She first learned her artistic skills from her family; her mother and aunt taught her basketry and her father, Mawalan 1, taught her the basics of Rirratjingu.[4] Her father, Mawalan Marika broke conventions and taught her how to paint sacred designs, which are usually reserved for men to paint.[7] Dhuwarrwarr is considered to be the first Yolngu woman authorized to paint sacred designs.[8] Her most popular artistic mediums include ochres on bark, carved and painted wooden figures, print making, and weaving. The mediums which she often uses include earth pigments on Stringybark, Earth pigments on Stringybark hollow poles, Pandanus and Natural Dyes, Earth pigments on native hibiscus, Earth pigments on Ironwood, and Print Making.[9] Her murals can be found in the Darwin Airport, the Atherton School in Queensland, the Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education, and across buildings in her community of Yirrkala.[10] She has created numerous beautiful prints at the Yirrkala Print Space at the Buku Art Centre. At the Yirrkala Print Space, [11] Dhuwarrwarr works alongside other female artists who are known to be leaders in innovation and change. She considers her artwork as a means of passing her culture to the next generations and a way of sharing her culture with the outside world. [4]

Collections

Dhuwarrwarr Marika is featured in major public collections across the world, including:

Significant exhibitions

Awards

  • 1990: Professional Development grant, from the Aboriginal Arts Unit of the Australia Council for the Arts

References

  1. "Australia", Wikipedia, 2020-05-03, retrieved 2020-05-03
  2. "Contemporary Indigenous Australian art", Wikipedia, 2020-04-29, retrieved 2020-05-03
  3. "Yolngu Culture". Dhimurru Aboriginal Corporation. Retrieved 2020-05-03.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 corporateName=National Museum of Australia; address=Lawson Crescent, Acton Peninsula. "National Museum of Australia - The Marika family". www.nma.gov.au. Retrieved 2020-05-03.
  5. "Dhuwarrwarr Marika". collections.anmm.gov.au. Retrieved 2020-05-04.
  6. "Dhuwarrwarr Marika". collections.anmm.gov.au. Retrieved 2020-05-04.
  7. "Dhuwarrwarr Marika". collections.anmm.gov.au. Retrieved 2020-05-04.
  8. "Dhuwarrwarr Marika". collections.anmm.gov.au. Retrieved 2020-05-04.
  9. "Buku-Larnnggay Mulka Centre" (PDF).
  10. "Dhuwarrwarr Marika". collections.anmm.gov.au. Retrieved 2020-05-04.
  11. "Buku Art Centre: Yirrkala Print Studio". Buku Art Centre.
  12. "Dhuwarrwarr Marika | Artists | NGV". www.ngv.vic.gov.au. Retrieved 2020-04-20.
  13. "NGA collection search results". artsearch.nga.gov.au. Retrieved 2020-04-20.
  14. "Art Gallery of New South Wales", Wikipedia, 2020-01-08, retrieved 2020-05-03
  15. "Dhuwarrwarr Marika". collections.anmm.gov.au. Retrieved 2020-05-04.
  16. "Dhuwarrwarr Marika". collections.anmm.gov.au. Retrieved 2020-05-04.
  17. "Dhuwarrwarr Marika". collections.anmm.gov.au. Retrieved 2020-05-04.
  18. "Dhuwarrwarr Marika". collections.anmm.gov.au. Retrieved 2020-05-04.
  19. "Dhuwarrwarr Marika". collections.anmm.gov.au. Retrieved 2020-05-04.
  20. "Dhuwarrwarr Marika". collections.anmm.gov.au. Retrieved 2020-05-04.
  21. "Dhuwarrwarr Marika". collections.anmm.gov.au. Retrieved 2020-05-04.
  22. "Dhuwarrwarr Marika". collections.anmm.gov.au. Retrieved 2020-05-04.
  23. "Dhuwarrwarr Marika". collections.anmm.gov.au. Retrieved 2020-05-04.
  24. "Dhuwarrwarr Marika". collections.anmm.gov.au. Retrieved 2020-05-04.
  25. "Dhuwarrwarr Marika". collections.anmm.gov.au. Retrieved 2020-05-04.
  26. "MutualArt.com - The Web's Largest Art Information Service". www.mutualart.com. Retrieved 2020-05-04.
  27. "MutualArt.com - The Web's Largest Art Information Service". www.mutualart.com. Retrieved 2020-05-04.
  28. "MutualArt.com - The Web's Largest Art Information Service". www.mutualart.com. Retrieved 2020-05-04.

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