Bryan W. Reeves

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Bryan W. Reeves
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Born
Bryan Withrow Reeves

(1974-05-18) May 18, 1974 (age 47)
Silver Spring, MD, U.S.
NationalityAmerican
CitizenshipUnited States of America
Alma materEmbry Riddle Aeronautical University
OccupationLife & relationship coach
Parent(s)Silvy Khoucasian
Websitebryanreeves.com

Bryan W. Reeves is a Life & relationship coach living in Los Angeles, CA. A former Captain in the U.S. Air Force, he left the military nine months before 9/11 at the age of 26. He spent the later part of his 20s backpacking through Europe, the Middle East, India and Australia, even living in Egypt for several months. Upon returning to the United States, he worked shortly for his father's company as a spokesman for a luxury timepiece using mind-body science technology and later became a Transformational Entertainment Artist Manager and Event Producer. In 2012, he transitioned from managing businesses and projects to consulting artists, visionaries, and business owners in successfully managing their own.[1] This was his transition into life coaching. Since then, Bryan released the popular book, Tell The Truth, launched several successful virtual relationship programs, and most recently mastermined the Men, This Way Podcast. [2] He currently lives in Los Angeles, CA with his partner, marriage and family therapist, Silvy Khoucasian.[3]

Early life

Reeves was born Bryan Withrow Reeves in Silver Spring, MD on May 18, 1974. Reeves’ parents had a second child, a daughter, before divorcing when Reeves was 4 years old. Raised in Columbia, MD, Reeves and his sister stayed with their mother who raised both kids while continuing to work full time as the Director of multiple community crisis centers in the greater Washington, D.C. area.[4]

When Reeves was 10, his family expanded to include two new sisters (Darcey and Francesca), a step-father (Jeff Ingram), and a step-mother (Ilonka Harezi). When his mother remarried, she gave birth to his second sister shortly after her wedding. He met his third sister when his father remarried Harezi, who had a daughter from a previous marriage.[5]

In his early teen years, he was profoundly influenced by his mother’s humanitarian service (she was inducted into Maryland’s Howard County Women’s Hall of Fame in 2004)[6], his step-father’s alcoholism, his step-mother’s mysticism, and infrequent access to his father who lived out of state.[7]

Reeves graduated high school 7th in his class, with the highest GPA of all graduating boys. He was active on multiple school teams, including wrestling, tennis, baseball, and soccer.[8]

He accepted a full scholarship from the US Air Force to attend Embry Riddle Aeronautical University in Prescott AZ, where he graduated at the top of his Electrical Engineering class and received The University’s Chancellor Award for Exemplary Leadership, Community Service, and High Achievement. He was president of his university’s Sigma Pi Fraternity chapter. [6]

Military service

After graduating, Reeves entered the US Air Force as a 2nd Lieutenant.

Although he openly shares that he experienced deep inner conflict and depression during his military service, he served on Active Duty with distinguished honors for 5 years, from January 1996 to January 2001.[9]

His first assignment was in the KC-135 Refueling Aircraft Depot at Tinker AFB in Oklahoma City, where he also earned his Master’s Degree in Human Relations from the University of Oklahoma.[10]

He was transferred in 1998 to Cape Canaveral Air Station in Cocoa Beach, FL, where he served in the 1st Space Launch Squadron, responsible for launching GPS Satellites.[11]

He was promoted to Captain in 1999, and separated from the military with an honorable discharge in 2001.[12]

Career

After his military service, from 2001 to 2003, Reeves traveled extensively throughout Europe, Australia, Egypt, and India. He lived in Bordeaux, France for 14 months.

In 2003, he left France and joined his father and step-mother in Miami, FL, to help them launch a new partnership and product, the Philip Stein Teslar luxury watch, for their 20-year old mind-body technology company. Within months after launch in August 2003, Oprah Winfrey took notice of the product and would feature it on her “Favorite Things” Holiday giveaway shows in 2003 and 2005.

Reeves has shared at public speaking events that his step-mother, Ilonka Harezi, was invited to be in the audience with the vice-president of his father’s company, Rina Stein, and the company’s PR rep during a 2006 taping of The Oprah Show. However, the day before they were scheduled to fly to the taping in Chicago, Harezi decided not to go but to send Bryan instead. This would prove to be a critical moment in Reeves’ career.

During the taping of her “Oprah After The Show” segment, Oprah asked about the technology inside the watch. As the PR rep began to answer incorrectly, Reeves stepped in to address Oprah’s question in front of the audience and cameras. In the words of Stein who observed the entire exchange, “Bryan had Oprah transfixed.”

Stein immediately appointed Reeves to the role of International Spokesperson, in addition to his duties as Director of Customer Service and Technical Research Director. From 2006 to 2008, Bryan traveled for magazine, newspaper, TV, and live interviews and presentations throughout Asia, Europe, South America, and North America.

The company quickly grew to gross profits of $50 million worldwide within 4 years.

Reeves left Philip Stein Teslar in 2007 over personal differences with his parent’s business partners.[13]

In 2008, while Reeves was with his father and step-mother in India working to raise money for the Nechung Oracle of Tibet’s monastery, their business partners executed a hostile takeover of the company. They returned home to locked doors at the company headquarters. A few years later after extensive litigation, Reeves’ parents were bought out of the company.[14]

In 2008, Reeves took over full-time management of the Miami-based independent music band, Here II Here, featuring former Menudo star, Ashley Ruiz.

For the next 4 years, until the band broke up in late 2011, Reeves managed every aspect of the band’s business, including PR & marketing, tour management, and album production and sales. From 2009-2010, Reeves toured for 12 months with Here II Here throughout the United States and Canada, performing over 200 concerts in 33 states, including a live appearance on Good Morning America in 2009. Due to the pop-spirituality aspect of their music and Reeves’ professional management connections, Here II Here was invited to perform at various events featuring worldwide luminaries and authors such as the Oracle of Tibet, Deepak Chopra, Byron Katie, Neale Donald Walsch, Marianne Williamson, Don Miguel Ruiz, Michael Beckwith, and many others.

After the band broke up in 2011, Reeves spent the next few years in Los Angeles working on various production projects. He produced live concerts for internationally renowned chant artists, Deva Premal and Snatam Kaur. He was a member of the Executive Council for the Global Alliance for Transformational Entertainment (GATE) where he was the assistant producer for GATE’s annual events featuring author Eckhart Tolle, comedian Jim Carrey, and an array of other notable celebrities such as Annie Lennox, James Edward Olmos, and Tom Shadyac.

In 2013, Reeves transitioned his business from managing artists and events to paid consulting with aspiring artists. This quickly turned into a private coaching practice to support all aspiring creators. By 2014, Reeves had coached over 140 clients.

In the media

              

References

  1. Lacey, Paul. "My Story - Bryan Reeves". bryanreeves.com/.
  2. "YouTube". www.youtube.com.
  3. "The Love and Relationship Academy with Bryan Reeves & Silvy Khoucasian". lra.teachable.com.
  4. ""Give me the hard shit, give me shit that's going to break me open because I needed to learn." — Bryan Reeves".
  5. "Bryan Reeves, Author at The Good Men Project".
  6. 6.0 6.1 Waseem, Fatimah. "Grassroots director to retire after 27 years". baltimoresun.com.
  7. "Tell the Truth, Let the Peace Fall Where it May". April 21, 2016.
  8. Rizkalla, Sarah (November 11, 2016). "When the Masculine Met the Feminine".
  9. "006 BRYAN REEVES: "What Women Say They Want–But Really Don't" » BOLD WITH LeGRANDE GREEN » Get BOLD today!". www.getboldtoday.com.
  10. "Bryan Reeves: Following Your Highest Excitement". April 15, 2015.
  11. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/f016c23e-1697-11da-8081-00000e2511c8.html?ft_site=falcon&desktop=true#axzz4ihNwpJwt
  12. http://staugustine.com/stories/122306/fashion_4290125.shtml#.WS9GBhPyuso
  13. "GCMT". www2.gcmt.com.
  14. Editor, Rod Stafford Hagwood Fashion. "Telling time". Sun-Sentinel.com.

External links

This article "Bryan W. Reeves" is from Wikipedia. The list of its authors can be seen in its historical. Articles taken from Draft Namespace on Wikipedia could be accessed on Wikipedia's Draft Namespace.