John Robert Cary

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Professor

John Robert Cary

PhD, CEO
Born (1953-03-15) March 15, 1953 (age 68)
Livermore, California
NationalityAmerican
CitizenshipUnited States of America
Known forSeparatrix Crossing, Plasma Acceleration
AwardsFellow, American Physical Society Senior Member, IEEE (2019); NPSS Charles K. Birdsall Award for Contributions to Computational Nuclear and Plasma Sciences (2016); John Dawson Prize for Numerical Simulation of Plasmas - Lifetime (2015); Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computation Award for Visualization (2008 & 2011); Buneman award for Best Still Visualization, International Conference on the Numerical Simulation of Plasmas (2007); Boulder Faculty Assembly Award for Research and Creative Work 1994; Regent's Fellow 1975-1976; President's Scholar 1971-1973
Scientific career
FieldsPhysics: Plasma, Beams, Computational
InstitutionsUniversity of Colorado - Boulder, Tech-X Corporation
ThesisNonlinear Wave Phenomena in Vlasov Plasma: A Lie Transform Approach (1979)
Doctoral advisorProfessor Allan N. Kaufman
Doctoral studentsCarl Bauer (2012), Brent Goode (2005), Jinhyung Lee (2004), Kiran Sonnad (2004). Scott Hendrickson, (1996), Peter H. Stoltz (1996), William E. Gabella (1991), David Leslie Bruhwiler (1990), Petre Rusu (1990)

John Robert Cary is a Professor of Physics at the University of Colorado Boulder (CU Boulder)[1] and CEO of Tech-X Corporation[2], which he co-founded in 1994.

In 1973 Professor Cary earned a BA cum laude in Physics and a BA cum laude in Mathematics from the University of California, Irvine. He earned his MS in Physics from the University of California, Berkeley in 1975 and his PhD in Plasma Physics in 1979.

Prof. Cary worked at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and then the Institute for Fusion Studies at the University of Texas, Austin, prior to joining the faculty at the University of Colorado. At the University of Colorado, Professor Cary has served as department chair, center director, and faculty mentor. In 1994, he co-founded Tech‑X Corporation, which concentrates on computational applications for science and engineering. Tech-X employs roughly 40 persons, nearly 2/3 of whom are PhDs, performs contract research, and sells computational software, including the VSim, USim, and RSim packages.

Prof. Cary personally has worked in a wide variety of areas related to plasma and beam physics, such as nonlinear dynamics, 3D MHD equilibria, reconnection, laser plasma acceleration, fusion plasma physics, but also in other fields, such as photonic structures, beam physics, computational algorithms, and electromagnetics of structures. As of this this writing (October, 2020), Prof. Cary has written hundreds of scientific papers, which have collectively been cited over 10,000 times, with 18 papers having 100 citations or more[3]. Data from one of his papersappeared on the cover of Nature, and Nature[4] listed this work as one of the highlights of 2004. The Russian mathematician Arnold listed separatrix crossing[5] as one of the 10 mathematical discoveries of the 1980’s[6].

Prof. Cary is a Fellow of the American Physical Society[7] and a Senior Member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

Professor Cary is the recipient of the 2019 IEEE Nuclear and Plasma Sciences Section Particle Accelerator Science and Technology Award[8], the 2016 IEEE Nuclear and Plasma Sciences Section Charles K. Birdsall Award for Contributions to Computational Nuclear and Plasma Sciences[9], and the 2015 John Dawson Prize for Numerical Simulation of Plasmas - Lifetime[10]. He has also won awards in visualization, include the 2007 Buneman award for Best Still Visualization, and the 2008 and 2011 Awards for Visualization of the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computation program.

Professor Cary has chaired or served on multiple committees of the American Physical Society[11] and the IEEE. He has served as associate editor for APS/AIP journals including the Reviews of Modern Physics, on committees of the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine, and on the organizing committees of various APS and IEEE[12] conferences. Professor Cary was elected chair of the Division of Plasma Physics of the APS in 2018[13].

In the media

References

  1. "John Cary". 5 April 2016.
  2. "Tech-X - Management".
  3. "John R Cary - Google Scholar". scholar.google.com. Retrieved 2020-10-10.
  4. "Highlights". Nature. 432 (7020): 943. December 2004. Bibcode:2004Natur.432..943.. doi:10.1038/432943a. ISSN 0028-0836.
  5. Cary, John R.; Escande, D. F.; Tennyson, J. L. (1986-11-01). "Adiabatic-invariant change due to separatrix crossing". Physical Review A. 34 (5): 4256–4275. Bibcode:1986PhRvA..34.4256C. doi:10.1103/physreva.34.4256. ISSN 0556-2791. PMID 9897774.
  6. Arnold, V. I. (1988). Geometrical Methods in the Theory of Ordinary Differential Equations. doi:10.1007/978-3-662-11832-0. ISBN 978-3-540-78038-0.
  7. "APS Fellow Archive". www.aps.org. Retrieved 2020-10-10.
  8. "Nuclear & Plasma Sciences Society | Particle Accelerator Science and Technology (PAST)". ieee-npss.org. Retrieved 2020-10-10.
  9. "Nuclear & Plasma Sciences Society | Past Recipients of the Charles K. Birdsall Award for Contributions to Computational Nuclear and Plasma Sciences". ieee-npss.org. Retrieved 2020-10-10.
  10. "Awards". www.icnsp.org. Retrieved 2020-10-10.
  11. "Appointed Committee 2010 - Division of Plasma Physics". apsdpp.org. Retrieved 2020-10-10.
  12. "ICOPS 2018 Denver". icops2018.org. Retrieved 2020-10-10.
  13. "History - Division of Plasma Physics". apsdpp.org. Retrieved 2020-10-10.

External links

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