Artemy Lyubovich

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Artemy Moiseevich Lyubovich
Артемий Моисеевич Любович
2nd People's Commissar of Posts and Telegraphs of the Soviet Union
In office
November 12, 1927 – January 16, 1928
Prime MinisterAlexey Rykov
Preceded byIvan Smirnov
Succeeded byNikolay Antipov
4th People's Commissar of Posts and Telegraphs of the Russian Socialist Federative Soviet Republic
In office
March 24, 1920 – May 26, 1921
Prime MinisterVladimir Lenin
Preceded byVadim Podbelsky
Succeeded byValerian Dovgalevsky
Personal details
Born
Artemy Moiseevich Lyubovich

(1880-10-29)October 29, 1880
Zhitomir, Volhynian Governorate, Russian Empire
DiedJune 28, 1938(1938-06-28) (aged 57)
Moscow, Soviet Union
Resting placeMinsk
Political partyAll–Union Communist Party (Bolsheviks) since 1917

Artemy (Artyom) Moiseevich Lyubovich (October 29, 1880, Zhitomir, Volhynian Governorate – June 28, 1938, Minsk) was a Soviet statesman, participant in the revolutionary movement, People's Commissar of Posts and Telegraphs of the Russian Socialist Federative Soviet Republic and the Soviet Union.

Member of the All–Union Communist Party (Bolsheviks) since March 1917.

Biography

The son of a construction foreman (tradesman). In 1894, he graduated from a two-class city school in Zhitomir.

  • 1896–1902 – A telegraph operator in Zhitomir, then in Kiev.[1]
  • 1902–1906 – Private telegraph operator of the 2nd Spark Company.
  • 1906–1914 – Telegraph operator in Kiev, then in Berdichev (from 1908) and Belaya Tserkov (from 1912).
  • 1914–1917 – Mobilized into the army: he served as a private in the 6th Railway Battalion, then as a telegraph operator in the Kronstadt Telegraph Company.
  • In 1917 – Member of the Kronstadt Committee of the Russian Social Democratic Labor Party (Bolsheviks), Chairman of the Council of Soldiers' and Sailors' Deputies, delegate to the 7th (April) All–Russian Conference and 6th and 7th Congresses of the Russian Communist Party (Bolsheviks), member Petrograd Military Revolutionary Committee at the Main Telegraph and Commissar of the Keksholm Reserve Regiment. After the October Revolution, editor of the newspaper Izvestia of the Kronstadt Soviet, then a member of the board of the People's Commissariat of Posts and Telegraphs and Deputy People's Commissar.
  • January – May 1918 – Chairman of the Kronstadt Committee of the Russian Social Democratic Labor Party (Bolsheviks).
  • 1918–1919 – Chairman of the All–Russian Union of Communications Workers.
  • 1919–1920 – Deputy People's Commissar of Posts and Telegraphs of the Russian Socialist Federative Soviet Republic and Head of the Communications Department of the Workers' and Peasants' Red Army.
  • 1920–1921 – Acting People's Commissar of Posts and Telegraphs of the Russian Socialist Federative Soviet Republic.[1]
  • Since 1923 – Deputy People's Commissar of Posts and Telegraphs of the Soviet Union.
  • 1927–1928 – Acting People's Commissar of Posts and Telegraphs of the Soviet Union.
  • 1928–1934 – Commissioner of the People's Commissariat of Communications of the Soviet Union for the Far East, Eastern Siberia.
  • 1934–1935 – At the disposal of the Central Committee of the All-Union Communist Party (Bolsheviks).
  • 1935–1937 – Deputy Chairman of the Council of People's Commissars of the Belarusian Soviet Socialist Republic and Chairman of the State Planning Commission of the Republic.[1]

Delegate to the 7th, 10th, 15th Party Congresses.

Arrested on July 5, 1937.

The memoirs of the Belarusian party worker Yakov Drobinsky describe the methods of investigation in the Minsk Central Prison in 1938:

"At ten he was again led through this corridor, into this room – but what a difference! During the day it was a quiet corridor, quiet offices in which neat, well-groomed people leafed through folders. In the evening Andrei walked as if through a line – the cries of the tortured, the square cursing of the torturers rushed from all the rooms. A body lying on the floor flashed somewhere. Andrey saw a crimson familiar face. It was Lyubovich – an old Bolshevik, Deputy Chairman of the Council of People's Commissars of the Republic, Chairman of the State Planning Commission. He was in the first government created by Lenin in October 1917. He entered there as Deputy People's Commissar of Communications Podbelsky. He was a member of the Small Council of People's Commissars, worked with Lenin. Now he was lying on the floor, being whipped with rubber, and he, an old sixty-year-old man, shouted: "Mom!". An instant, but it stuck in my memory forever".

— Yakov Drobinsky. "Chronicle of One Investigation /August 1937 – December 1939/", Page 85[2][3]

Convicted on June 28, 1938, by the Military Collegium of the Supreme Court of the Soviet Union to capital punishment. Charge: Articles 69, 79, 76 (participation in anti-Soviet right-wing organizations, sabotage in industry and agriculture). Shot on the same day, buried in Minsk.[4] Rehabilitated on February 29, 1956, by the Military Collegium of the Supreme Court of the Soviet Union.

Remembrance

On April 18, 2013, a memorial plaque to Artemy Lyubovich was unveiled on the building of the city gymnasium No. 3 (the former city school) in Zhitomir.[5]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Artemy Lyubovich (Hrono)
  2. Yakov Drobinsky (2012). Chronicle of One Investigation /August 1937 – December 1939/. SPIRIDONOV.DE.
  3. Roy Medvedev (2011). To the Court of History. Time. ISBN 978-5-9691-0629-1.
  4. "Belarusian "Memorial". Victim Lists". {{cite web}}: Cite has empty unknown parameter: |deadlink= (help)
  5. "In Zhitomir, a Memorial Plaque to Artem Lyubovich Was Opened on the Facade of School No. 3". Zhitomir Life. April 1, 2013.

External links

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