Amanda Hall

From Wikitia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Amanda Hall
Amanda Hall.jpg
Born
Marguerite Amanda Hall

(1956-10-04) October 4, 1956 (age 66)
Cambridgeshire, England, UK
NationalityBritish
CitizenshipUnited Kingdom
EducationCambridge School of Art
Occupation
Years active1978 - present; 44 years
Websiteamandahall-illustration.com

Amanda Hall (born 4 October 1956) is an award-winning British illustrator and author of children's picture books.[1] She is known to have illustrated and published 18 children’s picture books in 26 countries. Her artworks are regularly exhibited at the Chris Beetles Gallery,[2] St James’s, London. Hall’s artworks and illustrations have also been featured in various media publications, magazines, newspapers, and blogs such as The Observer Review, Bookology,[3] Illustrator Saturday,[4] The Independent on Sunday, TES, Eerdlings,[5] The Marginalian, TBK magand others.[6][7]

Early life and education

Hall was born and raised in Cambridgeshire, England. She was born into a creative family, surrounded by art, music, and writing. Her father was a teacher at art school. He painted and also designed for theatre. Her mother was a medical secretary and a published writer. She was the youngest of four children.

From 1975-1978, Hall pursued her studies in graphic art at the Cambridge School of Art. While still at college in 1977, Hall got an opportunity from Dinosaur Publications to illustrate a set of cards for the National Trust.

Career

After graduation, Hall moved to London to pursue her career as a freelance children’s book illustrator. Amanda’s first full-color publication in 1981 was The Gossipy Wife, a Russian folktale, which she retold and illustrated for Blackie and Son Limited.[8] Since then, she has illustrated eighteen children’s picture books (3 of which she also wrote) and eleven story collections for British and American publishers. By combining colored pencils, pastels, watercolor inks and gouache, Hall has established a method that enables her to create images bursting with color and style, giving her work a three dimensional quality.[9]

Hall has illustrated book collections, educational materials, picture books, and other commission works for various publishing clients across the UK and the US, including: Balzer & Bray/and imprint of Harper Collins, Barefoot Books, Chrysalis Children’s Books, Dorling Kindersley, Eerdmans Books for Young Readers, Frances Lincoln Children’s Books, Lion Children’s Books, Little Tiger Press, Pavilion Books, Sleeping Bear Press, Templar Publishing, Wisdom Tales and many others. Since 2011 Amanda’s work has been exhibited regularly at the Chris Beetles Gallery, St James’s, London.[10][11]

Illustration and Artworks

Hall is known to have collaborated on various illustration projects with notable children’s authors, including Jamila Gavin, Michelle Markel, Fiona Waters, Dawn Casey and Jennifer Berne. Books illustrated by Hall include:

  • The Gossipy Wife, adapted by Amanda Hall (Blackie and Son Limited, 1981) ISBN 0216910927
  • The Foolish Husbands, adapted by Amanda Hall (Blackie and Son Limited, 1987) ISBN 0872261549
  • How the Leopard got his Spots, written by Rudyard Kipling (Pavilion Books, 1994) ISBN 9781857932471
  • How the Camel got his Hump, written by Rudyard Kipling (Pavilion Books, 1994) ISBN 9781857932420
  • The Barefoot Book of Animal Tales, retold by Naomi Adler (Barefoot Books, 1996) ISBN 9780803720637
  • The Barefoot Book of Stories from the Sea, compiled by James Riordan (Barefoot Books, 1996) ISBN 9781898000093
  • Robi Dobi: The Marvellous Adventures of an Indian Elephant, written by Madhur Jaffrey (Pavilion Books, 1997) ISBN 9781851454098
  • Children Just Like Me: Our Favourite Stories, written by Jamila Gavin (Dorling Kindersley, 1997) ISBN 9780751355917
  • Good as Gold, written by Barbara Baumgartner (Dorling Kindersley, 1998) ISBN 9780751371653
  • All My Shining Silver, written by Barbara Baumgartner (Dorling Kindersley, 1998) ISBN 9780751328383
  • The Storytelling Star: Tales of the Sun, Moon and Stars, written by James Riordan (Pavilion Books, 1999) ISBN 9781862052026
  • The Hard to Swallow Tale of Jonah and the Whale, written by Joyce Denham (Lion Children’s Books, 2000) ISBN 9780745945031
  • The Stolen Sun, written by Amanda Hall (Frances Lincoln, 2002) ISBN 9780711218080
  • Lion’s Precious Gift, written by Barbara Bennett (Little Tiger Press, 2002) ISBN 9781854308130
  • Giant Tales, retold by Fiona Waters (Chrysalis Children’s Books, 2004) ISBN 9781843650177
  • Prince of the Birds, adapted by Amanda Hall (Frances Lincoln, 2005) ISBN 9781845071026
  • Tales from India, written by Jamila Gavin (Templar Publishing, 2011) ISBN 9781848772021
  • The Lion Classic Aesop’s Fables, retold by Margaret McAllister (Lion Children’s Books, 2011) ISBN 9780745962009
  • The Fantastic Jungles of Henri Rousseau, written by Michelle Markel (Eerdmans Books for Young Readers, 2012) ISBN 9780802853646[12][13][14][15]
  • The Barefoot Book of Jewish Tales, written by Shoshana Boyd Gelfand (Barefoot Books, 2013) ISBN 9781846868849[16]
  • In Andal’s House, written by Gloria Whelan (Sleeping Bear Press, 2013) ISBN 9781585366033
  • Brother Giovanni’s Little Reward: How the Pretzel Was Born, written by Anna Egan Smucker (Eerdmans Books for Young Readers, 2015) ISBN 9780802854209
  • Babushka, retold by Dawn Casey (Lion Children’s Books, 2015) ISBN 9780745965222
  • Out of This World: The Surreal Art of Leonora Carrington, written by Michelle Markel (Balzer & Bray / an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, 2019) ISBN 9780062441096
  • Little Bear: An Inuit Folktale, retold by Dawn Casey (Wisdom Tales, 2022) ISBN 9781937786915

Awards and recognitions

The books Hall has illustrated have been credited with the following awards and inclusions:

Out of This World: The Surreal Art of Leonora Carrington, written by Michelle Markel

  • The Society of Illustrators: “The Original Art” Annual Exhibition 2019. Featured Artist’s section.[17]
  • Amazon: Named as one of Amazon’s Best Nonfiction Books for January 2019
  • CCBC Choices (Cooperative Children’s Book Center): Annual best-of-the-year list 2020.
  • Banks Street College: Named one of Bank Street College’s Best Children’s Books of the Year 2020. Arts section

The Lion Classic Aesop’s Fables, written by Margaret McAllister

  • Junior Design Awards: Highly Commended in the best classic picture book 2012[18]

The Barefoot Book of Animal Tales, written by Naomi Adler

  • International Reading Initiative: Short-list 2003

The Barefoot Book of Jewish Tales, written by Shoshana Boyd Gelfand

The Fantastic Jungles of Henri Rousseau, written by Michelle Markel

  • Bank Street College: Best Children’s Books of 2013[20]
  • The Society of Illustrators: “The Original Art” Annual Exhibition 2012
  • Parents’ Choice: Winner of the Gold Award Spring 2013 Picture Books[21]
  • Junior Library Guild: Selection 2012
  • New York Public Library: Children’s Books 2012: 100 Titles for Reading and Sharing. Nonfiction section
  • Booklist: Top Ten Arts Books for Youth
  • Northern Lights Book Awards: Winner of the Art Category 2020[22]
  • Storytelling World Resource Awards: Stories for Pre-Adolescent Listeners honors selection 2014
  • Vermont Red Clover Award: Nominee 2013 – 2014
  • Capitol Choices: 2013
  • com: Best Illustrated Children’s Books of the Year 2012
  • Fuse # 8: 100 Magnificent Children’s Books for 2012
  • The Scottish Book Trust: Featured book in Ten Artistic Reads

Robi Dobi: The Marvellous Adventures of an Indian Elephant, written by Madhur Jaffrey

  • Parents’ Choice: Winner of the Silver Honor Award 1997 ‘A 1997 Illustrated Book Honor’

In Andal’s House, written by Gloria Whelan

  • Storytelling World Resource Awards: Stories for Pre-Adolescent Listeners honors selection 2014[23]
  • Bank Street College: Best Children and Young Adult Books of 2014.
  • South Asia Book Award (SABA): Highly Commended Book title for the 2014 for Children’s and Young Adult Literature.
  • Notable Social Studies Trade Books for Young People: Winner, 2014.

In the media

           

References

  1. "Featured Illustrator: Amanda Hall". Words & Pictures. Retrieved 26 December 2022.
  2. "Chris Beetles Gallery". www.chrisbeetles.com. Retrieved 26 December 2022.
  3. "Celebrating the Square Pegs - Bookology Magazine". www.bookologymagazine.com. Retrieved 26 December 2022.
  4. "Illustrator Saturday – Amanda Hall". Writing and Illustrating. 2 March 2019. Retrieved 26 December 2022.
  5. says, Cathy Ballou Mealey (24 August 2015). "How to Travel the World without Leaving the House, by Amanda Hall". Eerdlings. Retrieved 26 December 2022.
  6. "Illustrators in Focus – Amanda Hall". us9.campaign-archive.com. Retrieved 26 December 2022.
  7. "Amanda Hall on the funeverse". The funeverse! A poetry site for kids who love funny poems. Retrieved 26 December 2022.
  8. says, Lynne Clayden (13 April 2015). "Five Questions with Amanda Hall". Eerdlings. Retrieved 26 December 2022.
  9. "2013five-to-nine.pdf" (PDF). s3.amazonaws.com. Retrieved 26 December 2022.
  10. "Booklists". Cooperative Children's Book Center. Retrieved 26 December 2022.
  11. "2020 Rise: A Feminist Book Project List". Rise. 30 January 2020. Retrieved 26 December 2022.
  12. comments, Betsy Bird 3. "Review of the Day: The Fantastic Jungles of Henri Rousseau by Michelle Markel". A Fuse #8 Production. Retrieved 26 December 2022.
  13. Popova, Maria (9 December 2014). "Henri Rousseau's Heartening Story of Success after a Lifetime of Rejection, Illustrated". The Marginalian. Retrieved 26 December 2022.
  14. "TeachingBooks | The Fantastic Jungles of Henri Rousseau". www.teachingbooks.net. Retrieved 26 December 2022.
  15. "Fantastic Jungles of Henri Rousseau, by Michelle Markel | Booklist Online". www.booklistonline.com. Retrieved 26 December 2022.
  16. "Launching The Barefoot Book of Jewish Tales". Words & Pictures. Retrieved 26 December 2022.
  17. "The Original Art – Society of Illustrators". societyillustrators.org. Retrieved 26 December 2022.
  18. "Junior Design Awards 2022 | All your questions answered". Junior Magazine. Retrieved 26 December 2022.
  19. "Sydney Taylor Book Award". Wikipedia. 7 December 2022. Retrieved 26 December 2022.
  20. "Best Children's Books of the Year". Bank Street College of Education. Retrieved 26 December 2022.
  21. "Parents' Choice Foundation". www.facebook.com. Retrieved 26 December 2022.
  22. "2020 Northern Lights Book Awards Winners! | Book Awards". northerndawnawards.com. Retrieved 26 December 2022.
  23. "2014 Storytelling World Resource Awards". storytellingworld.com. Retrieved 26 December 2022.

External links